Friday, 23 April 2010

Peanut Pork

My camera is all broken at the moment (ie. I can't be bothered to replace the batteries just yet) so this week is something very very simple without pictures: a sandwich.

Brussels pâté
peanut butter


# Toast two slices of bread. Try and make it good bread. Sourdough or rye would go particularly well with this.

# Slather both slices with butter.

# Spread peanut butter on one slice. Again, make it good stuff. I don't want to sound like a wanker, but that unsweetened organic stuff from health shops is marvellous.

# Spread Brussels pâté nice and thick on the other slice of toast.

# Slice up some gherkins and lay them on one slice.

# Assemble your sandwich. Eat and enjoy.

# Practice saying "I'm not actually pregnant" in the mirror. You might need it if you eat the sandwich in public.

Friday, 16 April 2010

You May Also Like...

No HK again this week. Very poor excuse this time. My intended recipe relied on me getting a fairly rare item as fresh as I could, and I failed. I also failed to see that as a possibility, so also failed to create a back-up plan. FAIL, as the kids on the internets say.

Instead, here are three food blogs I enjoy, and I think you should too.

No Love Sincerer
Charlene makes utterly splendid looking food and does the kind of excellent cooking I would do if I were a real person and not a moron with an unreliable oven. Also, I am jealous of her balcony garden.

Serenely Full
Suz is one of the funniest food bloggers going. The reviews of MasterChef and tales of the kitchen absolutely crack me up. And oh yeah, she can cook too. She's a Daring Baker, even! I love this blog.

This Is Why You're Fat
If all that is too sensible, take a look at this. Brilliant long-running tumblr featuring truly disgusting home experiments and the artery-bursting treats offered up by real restaurants. I'm not going to lie, I get quite a lot of inspiration from this site.

See you next week.
R x

Friday, 9 April 2010

Meaty Monster Balls

I've been rather busy this week and didn't have time to plan anything. Cue a Thursday evening staring at my cupboards wondering what to do. Staring at cupboards can produce interesting results. Meatballs and Monster Munch, you say?

(serves 4)
12 meatballs
150g plain flour
75g butter
3 eggs
tomato pureé
assorted herbs and spices
3 bags of pickled onion flavour Monster Munch


# Heat some oil in a pan and cook your meatballs. Get 'em good and crispy.

# While the meatballs are cooking through, whisk together butter, flour, and eggs into a batter.

# To the batter, add a couple of tablespoons of tomato pureé and whatever herbs and spices you find delicious. I've gone for cayenne pepper, ground coriander, nutmeg, paprika, and basil.

# Crush up your three bags of Monster Munch. Try not to be too sad about it. Add it to the mix.

# Remove meatballs from the pan, and pour a good pool of oil in the pan to heat up. Put a little flour in a bowl and coat the meatballs. Then coat the meatballs in batter.

# Shallow fry the meatballs three at a time. Optional, but for really tasty balls, do a second coating of batter.

# Skewer three meatballs together and serve. A yoghurt or tomato-based dip is also an excellent idea. These are really not as disgusting as they sound.


Friday, 2 April 2010

Bunny Pudding

Horror Kitchen is taking a little break this week. The following recipe comes from A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes by Charles Elmé Francatelli c. 1860 (ISBN 0-946014-15-9) It is the most fabulously patronising cookbook I own.

Happy Easter!

No. 66. Rabbit Pudding.
Skin and wash the rabbit, and cut it up in pieces; fry these brown with a bit of butter. season with chopped onions, parsley, and winter savoury, pepper and salt, shake in a good spoonful of flour, moisten with a little ketchup and a gill of water; toss the saucepan about on the fire while the pieces of rabbit boil for about ten minutes, and then pour the whole into a proper sized basin lined with a suet or dripping crust; let the pudding be covered in with some of the paste, put it into a baking-dish half full of hot water, and placed in the oven, to bake for an hour and a-half.

Photo by Holly Burns.